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Alabama as a museum ship in Mobile Bay, Alabama, 1985

PHOTO BY ADRIEN LAMARRE 1985

This image or file is a work of a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers soldier or employee, taken or made as part of that person’s official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

Description
English: USS Alabama (BB-60) in port at Mobile, Alabama, USA. The ship is permanently moored in Mobile as a museum ship.

Coordinates: 30°40′54.6″N 88°0′51.93″W

Date 1985
Source U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Digital Visual Library
Image page
Image description page
Digital Visual Library home page
Author Adrien Lamarre, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

USS Alabama (BB-60)

Alabama-iii

USS Alabama (BB-60), a South Dakota-class battleship, was the sixth ship of the United States Navy named after the US state of Alabama.[A] Alabama was commissioned in 1942 and served in World War II in the Atlantic and Pacific theaters. She was decommissioned in 1947 and assigned to the reserve duty. She was retired in 1962. In 1964, Alabama was taken to Mobile Bay and opened as a museum ship the following year. The ship was added to the National Historic Landmark registry in 1986

USS Missouri (BB-63)

Missouri_post_refit

USS Missouri at sea in her 1980s configuration

USS Missouri (BB-63) (“Mighty Mo” or “Big Mo“) is a United States Navy Iowa-class battleship and was the third ship of the U.S. Navy to be named in honor of the US state of Missouri. Missouri was the last battleship built by the United States and was the site of the surrender of the Empire of Japan which ended World War II.

Missouri was ordered in 1940 and commissioned in June 1944. In the Pacific Theater of World War II she fought in the battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa and shelled the Japanese home islands, and she fought in the Korean War from 1950 to 1953. She was decommissioned in 1955 into the United States Navy reserve fleets (the “Mothball Fleet”), but reactivated and modernized in 1984 as part of the 600-ship Navy plan, and provided fire support during Operation Desert Storm in January/February 1991.

Missouri received a total of 11 battle stars for service in World War II, Korea, and the Persian Gulf, and was finally decommissioned on 31 March 1992, but remained on the Naval Vessel Register until her name was struck in January 1995. In 1998, she was donated to the USS Missouri Memorial Association and became a museum ship at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

USS_Missouri_COA

USS Missouri at sea in her 1980s configuration

USS Cascade (AD-16)

USSCascadeAD16

USS Cascade (AD-16), the only ship of its class, was a destroyer tender in the United States Navy.

Originally designed as a passenger-freighter, the Cascade was launched on 6 June 1942 by Western Pipe and Steel Company in San Francisco, California. The ship was sponsored by Mrs. Charles W. Crosse, wife of Rear Admiral Charles W. Crosse, USN. It was turned over to the Matson Navigation Company of San Francisco, California, for outfitting in October 1942. The Cascade was commissioned on 12 March 1943, Captain S. B. Ogden in command.

United Seamen’s Service

The United Seamen’s Service, sometimes abbreviated as the USS, is a non-profit, federally chartered organization founded in 1942 to promote the welfare of American seafarers and their dependents, seafarers of all nations, US government military and civilian personnel, and other persons engaged in the maritime industry.

Since its inception, the USS has provided services overseas for American and international seafarers. USS’s network of worldwide port centers offers seafarers two types of services:

  1. Building-centered services which provide recreation, communications, counseling, food, beverages and gift shop and health articles; and outreach programs which bring USS services to seafarers on shipboard, in hospital or detention. Services include repatriation, hospital visits, detention serviceshelping seafarers in prison, legal assistance and communications services, with overseas phone, fax and mail facilities at the USS centers.
  2. Ship-visiting and library services include staff visits to ships in port with information on local attractions, customs and culture and other required assistance. Fresh reading material, supplied by the USS affiliated American Merchant Marine Library Association, are brought to restock the ship’s library.

There are currently 7 port centers open: Bremerhaven, Germany; Casablanca, Morocco; Diego Garcia, B.I.O.T.; Guam, M.I.; Naha, Okinawa, Japan; Pusan, Korea; and Yokohama, Japan. Many other centers existed during the years of World War II and thereafter, including centers in Naples and Genoa, Italy; Bandar Mahshahr, Iran; Cam Ranh Bay, Vietnam; Alexandria, Egypt and Manila, Philippines.

While the main charter of the USS is to serve merchant marine personnel, a large part of their clientele over the years has come from United States Navy and other international military personnel. As the constitution of merchant marine fleets changed over time, with many computerized supertankers requiring only a handful of crewmen to operate, and with military deployment adjustments, many centers were forced to close due to reduced patronage. As an example the center in Naples, Italy was heavily dependent on personnel from the United States Sixth Fleet; during the 1970s, aircraft carriers (such as the USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), destroyer tenders (such as the USS Grand Canyon (AD-28) and USS Cascade (AD-16), as well as myriad destroyers and patrol gunboats made Naples their home, and sailors found the USS facilities another home away from home.

The U.S. Military has long cooperated with the United Seamens’ Service in a number of ways. DoD Directive 1330.16,[1] issued July 10, 1971 (now cancelled) provided for policies, procedures, and responsibilities governing DoD cooperation with and assistance to the United Seamen’s Service (USS) under Title 10, United States Code, Section 2604.[2]

Each year the USS confers its AOTOS (Admiral of the Ocean Sea) award upon individuals who have made significant contributions to maritime commerce.

The USS is one of 55 of the most respected charities which form the Global Impact coalition.

USS Midway (CV-41) prepares to moor at her final resting place at Navy pier in San Diego

Midway prepares to moor at her final resting place at Navy pier in San Diego where she will become the largest museum devoted to carriers and naval aviation. (10 January 2004)

Midway prepares to moor at her final resting place at Navy pier in San Diego where she will become the largest museum devoted to carriers and naval aviation. (10 January 2004)

The USS Midway Museum is a maritime museum located in downtown San Diego, California at Navy Pier. The museum consists of the aircraft carrier Midway. Wikipedia

USS Constitution, nicknamed “Old Ironsides”

1280px-USS_Constitution_1997

USS Constitution, nicknamed “Old Ironsides”, is the only surviving vessel of the original six frigates authorized by Congress in the Naval Act of 1794, which established the United States Navy. It served with distinction in the War of 1812 and is currently docked in Charlestown, Massachusetts, as the oldest commissioned warship afloat.

USS Missouri (BB-11)

USS Missouri (BB-11)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

USS Missouri (BB-11), a Maine-class battleship, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named in honor of the 24th state.

Missouri was laid down on 7 February 1900 by the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Company of Newport News, Virginia. She was launched on 28 December 1901 sponsored by Mrs. Edson Galludet, daughter of United States Senator Francis Marion Cockrell of Missouri, and commissioned on 1 December 1903, Captain William S. Cowles in command.

USS_Missouri_BB-11

Missouri lying at anchor

Pre-World War I

Assigned to the North Atlantic Fleet, Missouri left Norfolk, Virginia on 4 February 1904 for trials off the Virginia Capes and fleet operations in the Caribbean Sea. On 13 April, during target practice, a flareback from the port gun in her after turret ignited a powder charge and set off two others. No explosion occurred but the rapid burning of the powder suffocated 36 of the crew. Prompt action prevented the loss of the warship and three of her crew earned Medals of Honor for extraordinary heroism. After repairs at Newport News, Missouri sailed on 9 June for duty in the Mediterranean Sea from which she returned to New York on 17 December.

Fleet operations along the east coast and in the Caribbean during the next years were highlighted by her relief to earthquake victims at Kingston, Jamaica from 17–19 January 1907. In April, she took part in the Jamestown Exposition.

800px-USS_Missouri_(1906)

With the “Great White Fleet“, Missouri sailed from Hampton Roads on 16 December 1907, passing in review before President Theodore Roosevelt at the beginning of a world cruise, which was to show the world that American naval might could penetrate any waters. Calling at ports in the Caribbean and along the east coast of South America, the fleet rounded Cape Horn to call in Peru and Mexico before arriving at San Francisco, California on 6 May 1908 for a gala visit. In July, the fleet turned west for Honolulu, Hawaii, thence to New Zealand and Australia, arriving in Manila on 2 October. The most tumultuous welcome yet came in Yokohama, Japan, and with a call in Amoy, China, the fleet began the passage home by way of Ceylon, Suez, and ports in the eastern Mediterranean. Departing Gibraltar on 6 February 1909, the fleet was again reviewed by President Roosevelt upon its triumphant return to Hampton Roads on 22 February.

*** Four ships of the United States Navy have been named USS Missouri in honor of the state of Missouri:

See also

For other ships of the same name, see USS Missouri

USS MISSOURI – F4U’s F6F’s fly in formation September 2, 1945 Navy

WAR & CONFLICT BOOK ERA:  WORLD WAR II/VICTORY & PEACE

F4U’s F6F’s fly in formation during surrender ceremonies; Tokyo, Japan.  USS MISSOURI (in) left foreground.  September 2, 1945. (Navy)
NARA FILE #:  080-G-421130
WAR & CONFLICT BOOK #:  1370

USS Missouri (BB-63) (“Mighty Mo” or “Big Mo“) is a United States Navy Iowa-class battleship, and was the third ship of the U.S. Navy to be named in honor of the US state of Missouri. Missouri was the last battleship built by the United States, and was the site of the surrender of the Empire of Japan which ended World War II.

Missouri was ordered in 1940 and commissioned in June 1944. In the Pacific Theater of World War II she fought in the battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa and shelled the Japanese home islands, and she fought in the Korean War from 1950 to 1953. She was decommissioned in 1955 into the United States Navy reserve fleets (the “Mothball Fleet”), but reactivated and modernized in 1984 as part of the 600-ship Navy plan, and provided fire support during Operation Desert Storm in January/February 1991.

Missouri received a total of 11 battle stars for service in World War II, Korea, and the Persian Gulf, and was finally decommissioned on 31 March 1992, but remained on the Naval Vessel Register until her name was struck in January 1995. In 1998, she was donated to the USS Missouri Memorial Association and became a museum ship at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

USS Missouri

Huge formation of American planes over USS Missouri and Tokyo Bay celebrating the signing, 2 September 1945

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